Auditory, tactile and bimodal synchronization to the beat: a test of the auditory-motor enhancement hypothesis

Authors

  • Frank A. Russo Ryerson University
  • Paolo Ammirante Ryerson University
  • Aniruddh D. Patel Tufts University

Abstract

Previous tapping studies have suggested that auditory-motor coupling is more robust than visual-motor coupling in the context of rhythmic processing. Does the auditory advantage persist for other modalities? In the current study, nonmusicians were asked to tap their finger to the beat of auditory, tactile, and bimodal metronomes. Stimulus magnitude and rhythmic complexity were also manipulated. In conditions involving a large area of stimulation and simple rhythmic sequences, tactile synchronization closely matched auditory. Although this finding shows a limitation to the hypothesis of enhanced auditory-motor coupling for rhythmic processing, other findings clearly support it. First, there was a robust advantage with auditory information for synchronization with complex rhythm sequences; moreover, in complex sequences a measure of error correction was found only when auditory information was present. Second, higher order grouping was evident only when auditory information was present.

Author Biographies

Frank A. Russo, Ryerson University

Professor

Paolo Ammirante, Ryerson University

Post-Doctoral Fellow

Aniruddh D. Patel, Tufts University

Professor

Published

2016-08-18

How to Cite

1.
Russo FA, Ammirante P, Patel AD. Auditory, tactile and bimodal synchronization to the beat: a test of the auditory-motor enhancement hypothesis. Canadian Acoustics [Internet]. 2016 Aug. 18 [cited 2021 Oct. 28];44(3). Available from: https://jcaa.caa-aca.ca/index.php/jcaa/article/view/2968

Issue

Section

Proceedings of the Acoustics Week in Canada

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