Noises off: What vocalizations can and can't tell us about animal welfare

Authors

  • Caroline J. Hewson Dept. of Anatomy and Physiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, 550 University Avenue, Charlottetown, PEI, C1A 4P3, Canada

Keywords:

Behavioral research, Biocommunications, Natural frequencies, Random processes, Statistical methods, Vocalization

Abstract

The use of vocalizations in animal welfare research including pain-related, need-related and social vocalization was discussed. The method was more advantageous over less specific indices due to its multidimensional nature and its specific role in communication. Other such research included the effect on dogs in shelters of the noise from barking and stereotyped vocalization as a sign of extreme frustration.

Additional Files

Published

2002-09-01

How to Cite

1.
Hewson CJ. Noises off: What vocalizations can and can’t tell us about animal welfare. Canadian Acoustics [Internet]. 2002 Sep. 1 [cited 2024 Jun. 22];30(3):130-1. Available from: https://jcaa.caa-aca.ca/index.php/jcaa/article/view/1489

Issue

Section

Proceedings of the Acoustics Week in Canada