The emotionality of music: Death metal to amazing grace

Authors

  • Elysia Iversen University of Calgary, Red Deer College, Red Deer, Alta. T4N 5H5, Canada
  • Jane F. MacNeil Dept. of Psychology, University of Calgary, Red Deer College, Red Deer, Alta. T4N 5H5, Canada

Keywords:

Acoustics, Human engineering, Students, Music, Psychology

Abstract

A study was conducted to determine the effect of preferred and nonpreferred types of music on the cognitive and emotional performance of healthy young adults. A sample of 171 female and 59 male college students, enrolled in introductory psychology courses participated in the study, with a total of 95 students in phase one and 135 students in phase two. Participants in phase one completed Version 1 A through Cof the CEPT under the different background and sound conditions, selected randomly. Music selections were determined, based upon answers to an Individualized Music Preference Questionaire. The participants completed test A in the silent control condition, test Bin an appealing sound condition, and test C in an irritating sound condition. Thec results of the study support the fact that healthy young adults performed better cognitively and emotionally in the presence of background music, regardless of whether it was preferred or nonpreferred music.

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Published

2006-09-01

How to Cite

1.
Iversen E, MacNeil JF. The emotionality of music: Death metal to amazing grace. Canadian Acoustics [Internet]. 2006 Sep. 1 [cited 2021 Oct. 28];34(3):24-5. Available from: https://jcaa.caa-aca.ca/index.php/jcaa/article/view/1804

Issue

Section

Proceedings of the Acoustics Week in Canada