Dentals are grave

Authors

  • Darin Flynn Dept. of Linguistics, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada
  • Sean Fulop Dept. of Linguistics, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada

Abstract

A study has investigated certain auditorily based sound changes and assimilations, obtained by adjusting the definition of the feature [grave], and concomitant adjustments to the classification of segments. Dentals are considered [acute] in all Jakobsian taxonomy et sequentes, while their noise energy and their involvement in [flat] enhancement and assimilation suggest instead that they are [grave]. The study has argued that the Jakobsian feature [grave] does not require a predominance of low-frequency noise, but rather requires that the noise below 2.5 kHz is 'sufficiently audible' owing to a lack of predominance of high-frequency noise. This effectively extends the reach of the feature, since all the noisy sounds, which were classed as [grave] under the original definition are notably labials and velars. The study also highlighted that non-sibilant dentals too are [grave] as their noise energy is similar to that of labials.

Published

2008-09-01

How to Cite

1.
Flynn D, Fulop S. Dentals are grave. Canadian Acoustics [Internet]. 2008Sep.1 [cited 2021Apr.13];36(3):70-1. Available from: https://jcaa.caa-aca.ca/index.php/jcaa/article/view/2042

Issue

Section

Proceedings of the Acoustics Week in Canada