Hypothenar hammer syndrome: An underdiagnosed cause in workers exposed to hand-arm vibration

Authors

  • Alice Turcot Institut National de Santé Publique du Québec, QC, GIV 5B3, Canada
  • Marie Fortier Institut National de Santé Publique du Québec, QC, GIV 5B3, Canada
  • Miruna Dana Dumitrescu INSPQ 945 rue Wolfe, QC, Canada

Keywords:

Diseases, Hammers, Case reports, Cohort studies, Hand-arm vibration, Literature reviews, Occupational exposure, Rare disease, Thompson

Abstract

The literature reporting structural lesions such as HHS among HAVS patients is reported and and cases of thrombosis of the radial and cubital arteries that could account for the poor prognosis of HAVS patients are presented. The preliminary literature review on HHS found few studies on I-IHS. mainly case reports and a few small cohort studies. Thompson et al. (2006), Noël (1998) and Kaji et al. (1993) reported cases of HHS and Youakim (2006) reported one case of thenar hammer syndrome. Conn et al. (1970) first described HHS as a rare disease and found that among 1300 individuals presenting with hand ischemia, the prevalence of HHS is 1.6% and is reported as high as 7% in 333 vibration-exposed workers. Marie et al., 2007 and Kaji et al., 1993 found that the mean duration of occupational exposure to repetitive palmar trauma at HHS diagnosis is 21 years. HAVS and HHS can produce similar symptoms however, the presence of hand cyanosis and pain and ulcers and necrosis with or without Raynaud's phenomenon can lead to suspected HHS.

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Published

2011-06-01

How to Cite

1.
Turcot A, Fortier M, Dumitrescu MD. Hypothenar hammer syndrome: An underdiagnosed cause in workers exposed to hand-arm vibration. Canadian Acoustics [Internet]. 2011 Jun. 1 [cited 2021 Oct. 25];39(2):22-3. Available from: https://jcaa.caa-aca.ca/index.php/jcaa/article/view/2338

Issue

Section

Proceedings of the Acoustics Week in Canada

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