Reductions in finger blood flow induced by low magnitude hand-transmitted vibration

Authors

  • Ying Ye Human Factors Research Unit, Institute of Sound and Vibration Research, University of Southampton, Southampton SO 17 IBJ, United Kingdom
  • Michael J. Griffin Human Factors Research Unit, Institute of Sound and Vibration Research, University of Southampton, Southampton SO 17 IBJ, United Kingdom

Keywords:

Accelerometers, Blood, Blood flow, Hand-transmitted vibration, Leisure activities, University students, Vibrating tools

Abstract

The effect on finger blood flow of lower magnitude vibration in healthy female subjects was investigated. Twenty healthy female university students aged 18 to 30 years with no history of regular use of hand-held vibrating tools in occupational or leisure activities participated in the study. Finger blood flow (FBF) was measured in the middle fingers of both hands using plethysmography. The vibration was measured using an accelerometer in the VPM, and was monitored using a digital meter and oscilloscope. The medians and inter-quartile ranges of the FBF in the middle fingers of the exposed and unexposed hands during each of the seven 4-minute periods show that FBF did not differ between the exposed right hand and the unexposed left hand. There was no significant change in FBF between period (i) and period (ii) on either hand, indicating the 2-N force applied by the right hand did not change finger blood flow on either hand.

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Published

2011-06-01

How to Cite

1.
Ye Y, Griffin MJ. Reductions in finger blood flow induced by low magnitude hand-transmitted vibration. Canadian Acoustics [Internet]. 2011 Jun. 1 [cited 2021 Oct. 28];39(2):56-7. Available from: https://jcaa.caa-aca.ca/index.php/jcaa/article/view/2355

Issue

Section

Proceedings of the Acoustics Week in Canada