Clinical assessment of havs: Controversies in diagnosis and measurement

Authors

  • Ron House Department of Medicine, Division of Occupational Medicine, University of Toronto, Canada
  • Aaron Thompson Department of Medicine, Division of Occupational Medicine, University of Toronto, Canada

Keywords:

Industrial hygiene, Occupational diseases, Clinical assessments, Clinical experience, Diagnostic tests, Electrode placement, Hand-arm vibration, Hand-arm vibration syndrome, Health effects, Musculo-skeletal outcomes, Occupational health, Test batteries, Toronto

Abstract

The health effects due to hand-arm vibration and their measurement are discussed. The information presented is based on our clinical experience in assessing hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS) patients at the Occupational Health Clinic, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, a clinic with the largest volume of HAVS patients in Canada. There is good evidence that digital sensory neuropathy occurs due to hand-arm vibration exposure. There is epidemiologic evidence suggesting that various musculoskeletal outcomes may be associated with hand-arm vibration exposure. There is no single diagnostic test and a test battery is preferred with the overall results being interpreted by a physician experienced in HAVS diagnosis. Segmental or fractionated nerve conduction with electrode placement in the distal parts of the fingers is possible.

Published

2011-06-01

How to Cite

1.
House R, Thompson A. Clinical assessment of havs: Controversies in diagnosis and measurement. Canadian Acoustics [Internet]. 2011Jun.1 [cited 2021Jun.20];39(2):78-9. Available from: https://jcaa.caa-aca.ca/index.php/jcaa/article/view/2366

Issue

Section

Proceedings of the Acoustics Week in Canada