Evaluation of transmissibility properties of anti-fatigue mats used by workers exposed to foot-transmitted vibration

Authors

  • Mallorie Leduc School of Human Kinetics, Laurentian University, Sudbuiy, ON, P3E 2C6, Canada
  • Tammy Eger School of Human Kinetics, Laurentian University, Sudbuiy, ON, P3E 2C6, Canada
  • Alison Godwin School of Human Kinetics, Laurentian University, Sudbuiy, ON, P3E 2C6, Canada
  • James Dickey School of Kinesiology, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada
  • Michele Oliver School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, N1G 2W1, Canada

Keywords:

Anti-fatigue, Continued use, Dominant frequency, Field studies, Head injuries, Higher frequencies, Lower body, Musculoskeletal injuries, Underground mine, Vibration exposure

Abstract

A study reported considerable differences in the dominant frequency associated with locomotive operation compared to drilling or bolting off from platforms, suggesting a rationale for greater reports of vibration-induced white feet in workers with a history of exposure to higher frequency vibration at the feet. Ten participants, with no history of lower body musculoskeletal injury, head injury, diabetes, vasculopathy, or neuropathy, participated in this study. A four mat by two vibration exposure profile experimental design with one repeat was carried out. A mat effective amplitude transmissibility (MEAT) value greater than 100% indicated vibration was amplified as it traveled through the mat while a value less than 100% suggested the mat attenuated the vibration. Positive anecdotal feedback provided by miners in a field study also supports continued use of mats in underground mines.

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Published

2011-06-01

How to Cite

1.
Leduc M, Eger T, Godwin A, Dickey J, Oliver M. Evaluation of transmissibility properties of anti-fatigue mats used by workers exposed to foot-transmitted vibration. Canadian Acoustics [Internet]. 2011 Jun. 1 [cited 2021 Oct. 25];39(2):88-9. Available from: https://jcaa.caa-aca.ca/index.php/jcaa/article/view/2371

Issue

Section

Proceedings of the Acoustics Week in Canada

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