Relearning sound localization with digital earplugs

Authors

  • Régis Trapeau Department of Psychology, Université de Montréal, BRAMS (International Laboratory for Brain, Music and Sound), Pavillon 1420 boul. Mont Royal, Outremont, QC H2 V 4P3, Canada
  • Marc Schönwiesner Department of Psychology, Université de Montréal, BRAMS (International Laboratory for Brain, Music and Sound), Pavillon 1420 boul. Mont Royal, Outremont, QC H2 V 4P3, Canada

Keywords:

Acoustic cues, Auditory systems, Ethics committee, Experimental procedure, Hearing disorders, Neurological disease, Sound localization, Sound source, Spatial positions

Abstract

The auditory system infers the location of sound sources from the processing of different acoustic cues. As the size of the head and the shape of the ears change over development, the association between acoustic cues and our expectation of external spatial position can not be fixed at birth, but has to be plastic. Two female and four male students aged 26-3 2 years with no history of hearing disorder or neurological disease, participated as paid volunteers, after having given informed consent. The experimental procedures were approved by the local ethics committee. During a sound localization run, each location was pseudo-randomly presented five times, for a total of 125 trials per run. No feedback was given. At the beginning of a run, the listener was asked to seat and lean his neck on a neck rest, so that his head was centered and that the laser pointed the central speaker.

Published

2011-09-01

How to Cite

1.
Trapeau R, Schönwiesner M. Relearning sound localization with digital earplugs. Canadian Acoustics [Internet]. 2011Sep.1 [cited 2021Apr.12];39(3):116-7. Available from: https://jcaa.caa-aca.ca/index.php/jcaa/article/view/2438

Issue

Section

Proceedings of the Acoustics Week in Canada

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