Moving to the beat improves timekeeping in a rhythm perception task

Authors

  • Fiona C. Manning McMaster Institute for Music and the Mind, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
  • Michael Schutz McMaster Institute for Music and the Mind, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada

Keywords:

Program design, Rhythm perception

Abstract

A study that examines the effect of tapping on participants' sensitivity to changes in the temporal location of a probe tone is presented. The experiment was conducted using a customized program design by the MAPLE lab at McMaster University. Tones were presented to participants stimuli headphones and participants tapped on an electronic drum pad. During the experiment, participants were presented with a total of 64 trials. Half of the blocks employed a 101 of 400ms and the other half employed an 101 of 600ms. All participants gave informed consent and were remunerated with course credit for their participation. The effect of movement on rhythm perception is consistent with previous work showing that movement can affect the perception of metrically ambiguous stimuli.

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Published

2011-09-01

How to Cite

1.
Manning FC, Schutz M. Moving to the beat improves timekeeping in a rhythm perception task. Canadian Acoustics [Internet]. 2011 Sep. 1 [cited 2021 Oct. 18];39(3):124-5. Available from: https://jcaa.caa-aca.ca/index.php/jcaa/article/view/2442

Issue

Section

Proceedings of the Acoustics Week in Canada