Understanding the masking effects of noise on communication in natural environments

Authors

  • Robert Dooling Dept. of Psychology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, United States
  • Sandra Blumenrath Dept. of Psychology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, United States
  • Ryan Simmons Dept. of Psychology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, United States
  • Kurt Fristrup Natural Sounds Program, National Park Service, Fort Collins, CO, United States

Keywords:

Animals, Audition, Bioacoustics, Communication, Physiology, Adverse effect, Anthropogenic noise, Auditory systems, Broadband noise, Hearing loss, Natural environments, Pure tones, Sleep disturbances, Sound detection

Abstract

Anthropogenic noises can cause a variety of adverse effects on birds and other wildlife. These effects include stress and physiological changes, auditory system damage from acoustic overexposure, and masking of communication and other important biological sounds. A second reason is that, while all humans have similar auditory capabilities and sensitivities, the same is not true for all animals. Still another issue is separating the various effects of noise. There are well documented adverse consequences of elevated noise on humans including hearing loss, masking, stress, physiological and sleep disturbances, and changes in feelings of well-being, and it would not be too surprising to find a similar range of effects in animals. The simplest kind of masking experiment is to measure the sound detection thresholds for pure tones in the presence of a broadband noise.

Downloads

Published

2012-09-01

How to Cite

1.
Dooling R, Blumenrath S, Simmons R, Fristrup K. Understanding the masking effects of noise on communication in natural environments. Canadian Acoustics [Internet]. 2012 Sep. 1 [cited 2021 Oct. 18];40(3):42-3. Available from: https://jcaa.caa-aca.ca/index.php/jcaa/article/view/2530

Issue

Section

Proceedings of the Acoustics Week in Canada