Accounting for musicians' superior auditory serial-order identification: audition or notation?

Authors

  • J.A. Lymburner Dept. of Psychol., Univ. of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, Canada
  • A.J. Cohen Dept. of Psychol., Univ. of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, Canada

Keywords:

hearing, musical acoustics, musicians, auditory serial-order identification, audition, notation, sequential patterns

Abstract

Short-term memory for sequences of tones is typically better for listeners who have had musical training than for listeners who lack such training (e.g. Cohen, Trehub & Thorpe, 1989). It would seem that superior auditory skill would account for the musicians' advantage. However, several experiments in which listeners match visual patterns to short auditory sequences (e.g., Parncutt & Cohen, in preparation) suggest that facility with a notation system may be an important factor. Since there is no definitive answer as to whether the musicians' superiority for auditory serial-order identification is due to audition or to familiarity with notation, the present study examines various possibilities by presenting subjects with both visual and auditory cues to aid recognition of sequential patterns

Published

1994-09-01

How to Cite

1.
Lymburner J, Cohen A. Accounting for musicians’ superior auditory serial-order identification: audition or notation?. Canadian Acoustics [Internet]. 1994Sep.1 [cited 2020Oct.22];22(3):153-4. Available from: https://jcaa.caa-aca.ca/index.php/jcaa/article/view/895

Issue

Section

Proceedings of the Acoustics Week in Canada