Repetitive impacts from manual hammering: Physiologic effects on the hand-arm system

Authors

  • D.R. Peterson Biodynamics Laboratory, Univ. of Connecticut Sch. of Med., Farmington, CT 06030-6210, United States
  • M.G. Cherniack Biodynamics Laboratory, Univ. of Connecticut Sch. of Med., Farmington, CT 06030-6210, United States

Keywords:

Behavioral research, Human engineering, Physiology, Risk assessment, Hand-arm system, Physiological effects, Vibration mapping

Abstract

Vibration mapping was determined from individual trials on subjects performing a standardized hammering task. A set of four uni-axial accelerometers were placed perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of, and bisected the lengths of the distal, middle, and proximal phalanges, and the metacarpal of a particular finger. Conventional commercial hammers were used to provide single impact force mapping. As was expected, vibrations were observed to be higher in the distal phalanges when compared to the metacarpals. The peak acceleration values on the metacarpals were greater than the proximal phalanxes.

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Published

2001-09-01

How to Cite

1.
Peterson D, Cherniack M. Repetitive impacts from manual hammering: Physiologic effects on the hand-arm system. Canadian Acoustics [Internet]. 2001 Sep. 1 [cited 2021 Dec. 3];29(3):12-3. Available from: https://jcaa.caa-aca.ca/index.php/jcaa/article/view/1364

Issue

Section

Proceedings of the Acoustics Week in Canada