Perceived spatial separation induced by the precedence effect releases chinese speech from informational masking

Authors

  • Jing Chen Speech and Hearing Research Center, Department of Psychology, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, China
  • Chun Wang Speech and Hearing Research Center, Department of Psychology, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, China
  • Hongwei Qu Speech and Hearing Research Center, Department of Psychology, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, China
  • Wenrui Li Speech and Hearing Research Center, Department of Psychology, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, China
  • Yanhong Wu Speech and Hearing Research Center, Department of Psychology, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, China
  • Xihong Wu Speech and Hearing Research Center, Department of Psychology, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, China
  • A. Schneider Bruce Ctr. for Res. on Biol. Commun. Syst., Department of Psychology, University of Toronto at Mississauga, Mississauga, Ont., Canada
  • Liang Li Speech and Hearing Research Center, Department of Psychology, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, China

Keywords:

Image analysis, Information analysis, Pattern recognition, Signal processing, Signal to noise ratio, Spectrum analysis, Speech intelligibility, Spurious signal noise, Chinese speech, Energetic maskers, Informational masking, Noise masking

Abstract

The precedence effects to induce perceived spatial separation of target Chinese speech from informational or energetic maskers is discussed. The study also investigated the advantages of perceived spatial separation with two different sizes. The new approach used Chinese nonsense sentences as a speech signals and obtained results that are comparable to those reported from Freyman et al's study. The results show that advantage of perceived separation in releasing speeches from masking could extend to tonal Chinese which is not consistent with the prediction of two channel models.

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Published

2004-09-01

How to Cite

1.
Chen J, Wang C, Qu H, Li W, Wu Y, Wu X, Bruce AS, Li L. Perceived spatial separation induced by the precedence effect releases chinese speech from informational masking. Canadian Acoustics [Internet]. 2004 Sep. 1 [cited 2021 Oct. 20];32(3):186-7. Available from: https://jcaa.caa-aca.ca/index.php/jcaa/article/view/1690

Issue

Section

Proceedings of the Acoustics Week in Canada