Talking while chewing: Speaker response to natural perturbation of speech

Authors

  • Connor Mayer Dept. of Linguistics, University of British Columbia, 2613 West Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada
  • Bryan Gick Dept. of Linguistics, University of British Columbia, 2613 West Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada
  • Elizabeth Ferch Dept. of Linguistics, University of British Columbia, 2613 West Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada

Keywords:

In-control, Natural perturbations

Abstract

A study was conducted to investigate the acoustic and articulatory effects of chewing during speech. The proposed that speakers in control of this type of highly complex articulatory perturbation during speech were to show evidence of optimizing to maintain acoustic-auditory speech goals. Acoustic distinctions were expected to be maintained between sibilants when perturbation forced significant articulatory differences in tongue shape. The stimuli consisted of the carrier phrase 'I'm a-----', followed by one of the three words containing the phonemes of interest, such as 'saw', 'shaw', or 'raw'. Stimuli were presented in four blocks for each condition of the investigations, with each block containing four repetitions of each word, resulting in 32 tokens for each word.

Published

2009-09-01

How to Cite

1.
Mayer C, Gick B, Ferch E. Talking while chewing: Speaker response to natural perturbation of speech. Canadian Acoustics [Internet]. 2009Sep.1 [cited 2020Oct.24];37(3):144-5. Available from: https://jcaa.caa-aca.ca/index.php/jcaa/article/view/2175

Issue

Section

Proceedings of the Acoustics Week in Canada

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