Jet noise prediction using a fully unstructured large eddy simulation solver

Authors

  • Arnaud Fosso Pouangué GAUS, Faculté de Génie, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC, Canada
  • Marlene Sanjoseacute GAUS, Faculté de Génie, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC, Canada
  • Stephane Moreau GAUS, Faculté de Génie, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC, Canada

Keywords:

Acoustics, Mixing, Nozzles, Acoustic sources, Cell size, Cold jet, Dissipation effects, Grid size, Jet noise prediction, Mixing layers, Natural transition, Nozzle exits, Nozzle geometries, Permeable surface, Tetrahedral elements, Transition regions

Abstract

The grid is fully unstructured using only tetrahedral elements. Maximum cell sizes in the acoustic source area, namely the mixing layer and the transition region, allow capturing frequencies at least up to a Strouhal number (Sir) of 1.5. A finer meshing is done in the nozzle boundary layer in order to allow a natural transition to turbulence of the mixing layer at the nozzle exit. Acoustic sources data are collected on surfaces at about 1.5D from the jet in order to avoid dispersion and dissipation effects and limit the grid size. Acoustic prediction is then performed using the permeable surface formulation of the Ffowcs-Williams and Hawkings analogy implemented in the MCAAP code. Both aerodynamic and aeroacoustic results obtained on cold jets with and without nozzle geometry show good agreement with experiments.

Downloads

Published

2011-09-01

How to Cite

1.
Pouangué AF, Sanjoseacute M, Moreau S. Jet noise prediction using a fully unstructured large eddy simulation solver. Canadian Acoustics [Internet]. 2011 Sep. 1 [cited 2021 Dec. 4];39(3):38-9. Available from: https://jcaa.caa-aca.ca/index.php/jcaa/article/view/2399

Issue

Section

Proceedings of the Acoustics Week in Canada