The use of elastic interlayers for improving sound insulation in attached dwellings: Field study results from timber frame masonry,and steel frame apartments in the UK

  • Roderick Mackenzie Building Performance Centre, Institute for Sustainable Construction, Edinburgh Napier University, 42 Colinton Road, Edinburgh EH10 5BT, United Kingdom
  • R. Sean Smith Building Performance Centre, Institute for Sustainable Construction, Edinburgh Napier University, 42 Colinton Road, Edinburgh EH10 5BT, United Kingdom
Keywords: Building codes, Buildings, Floors, Building regulations, Field studies, Field testing, High frequency, Isolation effects, Lower frequencies, Steel frame, Structural junction, Timber frames

Abstract

The article outlines the development and field testing of two mass-market elastic interlayers, for walls and for floors. Both products have repeatedly turned what were adequately performance partitions into the highest performing mass-market walls and floors in the UK, and have acted as a robust safety net to prevent floors and walls that were compromised by poor workmanship from failing building regulations. Flanking noise accounts for 12 of the 13 basic transmission pathways between attached dwellings, taking place via structural junctions, cavities, or unintentional workmanship errors. The Icopal Bridgestop system acts both as an isolator at lower frequencies and as an acoustic dampener for high frequencies. By placing the continuous isolator under each leaf, there is a doubled isolation effect between wall leaf and support and wall leaf to wall leaf.
Published
2011-09-01
How to Cite
1.
Mackenzie R, Sean Smith R. The use of elastic interlayers for improving sound insulation in attached dwellings: Field study results from timber frame masonry,and steel frame apartments in the UK. Canadian Acoustics [Internet]. 2011Sep.1 [cited 2019Sep.19];39(3):46-7. Available from: https://jcaa.caa-aca.ca/index.php/jcaa/article/view/2403
Section
Proceedings of the Acoustics Week in Canada