Variation of astc ratings due to flanking transmission within a residential conversion

  • Clair W. Wakefield Wakefield Acoustics Ltd., 301 - 2250 Oak Bay Avenue, Victoria, BC V8R 1G5, Canada
  • Andrew P. Williamson Wakefield Acoustics Ltd., 301 - 2250 Oak Bay Avenue, Victoria, BC V8R 1G5, Canada
Keywords: Architectural acoustics, Airborne sound insulation, Flanking transmission, High variability, In-field, Laboratory test, Small rooms, Sound leakage, Sound transmission, Wake fields, Wall construction

Abstract

Swift House is an older building in Victoria's downtown core that originally served warehouse and/or commercial purposes but many years ago was converted to a homeless shelter having many small rooms. Wakefield Acoustics Ltd. conducted a series of Apparent Sound Transmission Class (ASTC) tests between units and found the variability of measured ASTC's to be much wider than typically observed in new condominium buildings. This paper describes the ASTC tests conducted and discusses the suspected reason for the high variability in results. The BCBC recognizes that residential unit demising walls rarely provide the same degree of airborne sound insulation in field (real world) situations as they do in laboratory test situations. Reduced ASTC ratings in field tests are sometimes due to sound leakage via cracks and/or gaps, or to other flaws in wall construction.
Published
2012-09-01
How to Cite
1.
Wakefield CW, Williamson AP. Variation of astc ratings due to flanking transmission within a residential conversion. Canadian Acoustics [Internet]. 2012Sep.1 [cited 2019Sep.19];40(3):68-9. Available from: https://jcaa.caa-aca.ca/index.php/jcaa/article/view/2543
Section
Proceedings of the Acoustics Week in Canada