Speaking Versus Smiling: The Labiodentalization of Bilabials in Korean

Authors

  • Elisabeth Kang The University of British Columbia
  • Yadong Liu The University of British Columbia
  • Annabelle Purnomo The University of British Columbia
  • Melissa Wang The University of British Columbia
  • Bryan Gick <p>The University of British Columbia</p><p><span id="docs-internal-guid-183cd47d-7fff-45d0-14e2-b073a1f64e67"><span>Haskins Laboratory</span></span></p>

Abstract

Speech production generates many instances of conflict between synchronous movements in opposing directions. Previous research has identified such instances of conflict between smiling (lip spreading/opening) and bilabial sounds (lip compression/closing), resulting in labiodentalized variants of English bilabial stops (i.e., /p/ → [f]) [Chan et al. 2018, JASA, 144(3)]. However, because labiodentals exist in English, it remains unclear whether this resolution is physiological or phonological (i.e., learned substitution). The present study investigates the articulation of bilabials in neutral and smiled contexts in Korean, a language with no labiodentals. Tokens were extracted from natural running speech of 24 YouTube interviews and vlogs (26 speakers) using OpenFace 2.0 [Baltrusaitis et al. 2018, IEEE]. Activations of associated facial Action Units (AU), “lip corner puller” (AU12) and “lip tightener” (AU23), in the production of bilabials were analyzed. As in English, labiodentalization of bilabial stops was observed during smiled conditions, indicating that it is a physiological rather than phonological process in Korean. In the smiling condition, AU intensity results reveal decreased “lip corner puller” activity during bilabial closures and decrease “lip tightener” activity during labiodental closures, suggesting the body may resolve conflicts by suppressing one or the other movement.

Author Biographies

Elisabeth Kang, The University of British Columbia

Department of Linguistics

Yadong Liu, The University of British Columbia

Department of Linguistics

Annabelle Purnomo, The University of British Columbia

Department of Linguistics

Melissa Wang, The University of British Columbia

Department of Linguistics

Bryan Gick, <p>The University of British Columbia</p><p><span id="docs-internal-guid-183cd47d-7fff-45d0-14e2-b073a1f64e67"><span>Haskins Laboratory</span></span></p>

Department of Linguistics

Additional Files

Published

2021-08-23

How to Cite

1.
Kang E, Liu Y, Purnomo A, Wang M, Gick B. Speaking Versus Smiling: The Labiodentalization of Bilabials in Korean. Canadian Acoustics [Internet]. 2021 Aug. 23 [cited 2024 Jul. 15];49(3):36-7. Available from: https://jcaa.caa-aca.ca/index.php/jcaa/article/view/3932

Issue

Section

Proceedings of the Acoustics Week in Canada

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