Discrimination of frequency transitions as a function of varying spectral cues among young and elderly adults

Authors

  • J.F. MacNeil Calgary Univ., Alta., Canada
  • E.B. Slawinski Calgary Univ., Alta., Canada

Keywords:

hearing, hearing sensitivity loss, speech discrimination, age-related changes, auditory function, speech perception, pure tone sensitivity levels, spectral characteristics

Abstract

Next to the changes that are noted in hearing sensitivity loss, the deterioration in speech discrimination is the most commonly recognized characteristic of age-related changes in auditory function. This well-documented reduction in speech discrimination is a pivotal auditory problem associated with aging given that elderly individuals without a high sensitivity loss report difficulty in understanding speech in optimum conditions; that is speech perception difficulties are greater than would be expected on the basis of pure tone sensitivity levels. One relevant aspect underlying the difficulties that elderly adults experience may be a function of the brevity and rapid spectral changes which characterize some speech segments. Indeed, reduced spectral and temporal resolution has been reported for elderly listeners who demonstrate normal pure tone thresholds (Cranford and Stream, 1991; Maden and Feth, 1992; Robin and Royer, 1989; Trainor and Trehub, 1989). The authors investigated how various spectral characteristics influence discrimination of short duration, dynamic signals as a function of age

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Published

1992-09-01

How to Cite

1.
MacNeil J, Slawinski E. Discrimination of frequency transitions as a function of varying spectral cues among young and elderly adults. Canadian Acoustics [Internet]. 1992 Sep. 1 [cited 2022 Sep. 29];20(3):7-8. Available from: https://jcaa.caa-aca.ca/index.php/jcaa/article/view/712

Issue

Section

Proceedings of the Acoustics Week in Canada