Hand-arm vibration associated with the use of riveting hammers in the aerospace industry and efficiency of `antivibration' devices

Authors

  • P.-E. Boileau IRSST, Montreal, Que., Canada
  • H. Scory IRSST, Montreal, Que., Canada
  • G. Brooks
  • M. Amram

Keywords:

biological effects of acoustic radiation, aircraft panels, punching strokes, bucking bar, vibration white finger disease, Raynaud's phenomenon, exposure levels, vacuum pads, hand-transmitted vibration levels

Abstract

Riveting hammers are widely used in the aerospace industry for assembling aircraft panels. The process of riveting usually involves punching strokes on the rivet head while a bucking bar is held on the other end of the rivet for closing it up. The installation of a rivet takes only a fraction of a second but is known to subject both the operators of the riveting hammer and of the bucking bar to significantly high levels of vibration. Such vibrations are susceptible to contribute to the development of vibration white finger disease of which Raynaud's phenomenon is most widely known. The authors evaluate the exposure levels associated with the use of typical riveting hammers and bucking bars used in an assembly plant some of these devices being characterized as `antivibration' devices, in an effort to evaluate their efficiency for reducing vibration exposure following the ISO 5349 guidelines. In addition, an evaluation of specially designed vacuum pads, mainly aimed at reducing the noise radiated, to establish their potential effect on hand-transmitted vibration levels

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Published

1992-09-01

How to Cite

1.
Boileau P-E, Scory H, Brooks G, Amram M. Hand-arm vibration associated with the use of riveting hammers in the aerospace industry and efficiency of `antivibration’ devices. Canadian Acoustics [Internet]. 1992 Sep. 1 [cited 2021 Dec. 8];20(3):15-6. Available from: https://jcaa.caa-aca.ca/index.php/jcaa/article/view/716

Issue

Section

Proceedings of the Acoustics Week in Canada