Hearing and cognitive performance in low-frequency noise

  • Ann M. Nakashima Defence Research and Development Canada - Toronto, 1133 Sheppard Ave West, Toronto, Ont. M3M 3B9
  • Sharon M. Abel Defence Research and Development Canada - Toronto, 1133 Sheppard Ave West, Toronto, Ont. M3M 3B9
  • Matthew Duncan Defence Research and Development Canada - Toronto, 1133 Sheppard Ave West, Toronto, Ont. M3M 3B9
  • David Smith Defence Research and Development Canada - Toronto, 1133 Sheppard Ave West, Toronto, Ont. M3M 3B9
Keywords: Acoustic noise, Cognitive systems, Military vehicles, Signal detection, Speech intelligibility, Speech processing, Auditory detection, Low-frequency noise, Octave band frequencies

Abstract

The auditory detection, speech intelligibility and cognition performance in armored vehicle low-frequency noise, was investigated. 36 human subjects aged 18 to 55 with hearing thresholds no greater than 25 dB HLat 0.5 kHz, 1 kHz, 2 kHz and 4 kHz were subjected to battery of tests, under pink noise, and recorded LAV III noise (light-armored vehicles) under unoccluded, wearing a passive earmuff and an active earmuff listening conditions. Auditory detection was measured using a variation of Bekesy tracking at six third octave band frequencies from 0.5 kHz to 8 kHz and speech understanding was evaluated using the Modified Rhyme Test (MRT). The cognitive test battery consisted of two subjective questionnaires relating to mood, motivation and fatigue. It was observed that mean unoccluded thresholds in quiet were less than 20 dB while it increased to 36 dB when muff was worn. result shows that use of the ear muff in pink or vehicle noise don't affect signal detection at any frequency.
Published
2006-09-01
How to Cite
1.
Nakashima AM, Abel SM, Duncan M, Smith D. Hearing and cognitive performance in low-frequency noise. Canadian Acoustics [Internet]. 2006Sep.1 [cited 2019Dec.10];34(3):110-1. Available from: //jcaa.caa-aca.ca/index.php/jcaa/article/view/1846
Section
Proceedings of the Acoustics Week in Canada