Controlling for age related hearing loss can eliminate aging differences in lexical competition: Evidence from eye-tracking as an online measurement of age and noise effects on listening

Authors

  • B.M. Ben-David Centre for Research on Biological Communication Systems, Department of Psychology, University of Toronto Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road, N., Mississauga, ON L5L 1C6, Canada
  • C.G. Chambers Centre for Research on Biological Communication Systems, Department of Psychology, University of Toronto Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road, N., Mississauga, ON L5L 1C6, Canada
  • M. Daneman Centre for Research on Biological Communication Systems, Department of Psychology, University of Toronto Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road, N., Mississauga, ON L5L 1C6, Canada
  • M.K. Pichora-Fuller Centre for Research on Biological Communication Systems, Department of Psychology, University of Toronto Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road, N., Mississauga, ON L5L 1C6, Canada
  • E. Reingold Centre for Research on Biological Communication Systems, Department of Psychology, University of Toronto Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road, N., Mississauga, ON L5L 1C6, Canada
  • B.A. Schneider Centre for Research on Biological Communication Systems, Department of Psychology, University of Toronto Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road, N., Mississauga, ON L5L 1C6, Canada

Keywords:

Age-related, Eye-tracking, Hearing loss, Listening-in, Noise effects, Older adults, Older People, On-line measurement, Word identification

Abstract

A study was conducted to gather evidence from eye-tracking as an online measurement of age and noise effects on listening in older people. The study extended the investigation to compare younger and older listeners' performance in normal and challenging listening situations. It was ensured that the overall accuracy was equated, resulting in direct evaluation of differences existing in younger and older listeners in terms of the implicit on-line mechanisms that led to correct word identification. Tests were conducted to evaluate the ability of these listeners to distinguish the target word from a similar sounding alternative, as the target was unfolded in time. Twenty-four young adults and 24 older adults native English speakers participated in the study.

Published

2009-09-01

How to Cite

1.
Ben-David B, Chambers C, Daneman M, Pichora-Fuller M, Reingold E, Schneider B. Controlling for age related hearing loss can eliminate aging differences in lexical competition: Evidence from eye-tracking as an online measurement of age and noise effects on listening. Canadian Acoustics [Internet]. 2009Sep.1 [cited 2021May6];37(3):150-1. Available from: https://jcaa.caa-aca.ca/index.php/jcaa/article/view/2178

Issue

Section

Proceedings of the Acoustics Week in Canada