Minimizing Sonic Boom Noise to Meet Potential Regulatory Limits

  • John Halpenny Carleton University
  • Joana Rocha Carleton University

Abstract

Sonic boom noise is predicted from parameters including aircraft weight, volume, shape, and standard atmospheric models. The acoustic field near the aircraft is calculated based on a cylindrical approximation to the aircraft shape and a variable lift distribution. Sound is propagated from the aircraft to the ground by considering both the sharpening of the boom due to shock ageing, and the softening of the sound due to frequency dependent atmospheric absorption. The resultant pressure signature at ground level is converted to a perceived sound level and compared to a maximum proposed noise limit of 75 dB. Obtained results are verified using NASA’s PCBoom program as well as with selected ground measurements for supersonic flights. Preliminary results show that inoffensive supersonic flight may require either high altitudes, or aircraft that are smaller and lighter than most common airliners.

Author Biographies

John Halpenny, Carleton University

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

M.A.Sc. student

Joana Rocha, Carleton University

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Associate Professor

Published
2019-10-16
How to Cite
1.
Halpenny J, Rocha J. Minimizing Sonic Boom Noise to Meet Potential Regulatory Limits. Canadian Acoustics [Internet]. 2019Oct.16 [cited 2019Nov.22];47(3):70-1. Available from: //jcaa.caa-aca.ca/index.php/jcaa/article/view/3333
Section
Proceedings of the Acoustics Week in Canada